What do self-made millionaires do for a living?

Stressful. I became a self made millionaire at 20 and am 28 today. My total net worth is around 10m right at this very moment, only a few million is liquid (cash, stocks, bonds, hard money loans, real estate, etc. basically excluding my company valuation).

Being a self made millionaire is great but stress, emotional highs, and emotional lows are just a normal part of every day. Its worth it for me because I love what I do but certainly is not for everyone. It feels good to crush goals but the amount of work it took behind them is often times unimaginable. Some days you lose 100k in the blink of an eye, some days you get sued, some years you see your net worth get crushed, some years you’re pulling in multi million dollar incomes, etc. Highs and lows in everyone’s career is normal but the numbers being thrown around are much larger and there is more at stake.

Let me give you an idea. On August 4th, 2016, I was sitting in a meeting with my board about significantly cutting expenses as our old business model was falling apart and we were losing 40k a month of our own capital at that point. We were bootstrapped with no investors or debt and built an 8 figure yearly business and 2016 was our first 7 figure year since 2011. As CEO and primary shareholder, I slashed my salary to $0, fired 1 underperforming employee, gave 3 key employees raises, and went to work trying to get us out of our predicament. Life was hard last August… I was struggling in so many ways I can not explain how defeated I felt. My soul felt crushed under the weight of my failure. Today, August 4th, 2017, we have doubled our employee count and still hiring, we are generating massive growth and gross profits in our new found business model, and we’re expecting to hit 15–20m in revenue in 2018 at high gross margins. 80% of our competitors are out of business as they didn’t innovate. We innovated and we’re #1 in our created industry. I am feeling more optimistic than ever but wiser with a lot of scars.

How does it feel? Scary but amazing. But, I like living life on the edge I guess. I don’t know how to sit still. I have this insatiable desire to keep going and I love that. I’ve recognized material possessions are pretty useless at a pretty young age (been there, done that), and I’ve also recognized I’m in a position where I can build a large net worth at a young age and spend a lot of my time in philanthropy. I would love to dedicate my life to helping underprivileged communities flourish by helping locals build businesses, building clinics and orphanages, and directing a large part of our interest from our net worth towards accomplishing this dream. I hope in 10 years or maybe 8 years ideally, I will be doing just that.

When I think about that, I realize that I’m living my dream. I wouldn’t take it back even though I know I’ll feel just as bad as I did on August 4th, 2016 again someday. August 4th wasn’t the first time, it was just the first time in 5 years that I felt that way. I’ll be ready next time around, even if thats only 5% more ready.

The rest is background noise. Yes, I travel a lot and have a lot of freedom thanks to the money but 90% of my mind space is consumed by my next goal.

 

Own Your Own Slice Of Scotland For Just Six Hundred Grand

Own Your Own Slice Of Scotland For Just Six Hundred Grand

Fancy owning a part of a remote island in the most northerly of Scottish isles? Well, for six hundred grand it’s all yours.

The 98-hectare Fethaland croft, in North Roe, is on sale for £595,000 ($807,445), having been uninhabited for almost 80 years.

Part of the Shetland Islands, it’s on the market alongside three smaller, tenanted crofts, one of which has a four-bedroom family home.

Credit: Cascade News

Credit: Cascade News

David Murray’s family have owned the land for 150 years, but due to health reasons he’s been forced to sell up. He described doing so as ‘heartbreaking’.

Fethaland is popular with walkers and tourists, with human settlement dating back to prehistoric times. Even today it still features an Iron Age house and a Viking quarry.

Among its many features, it boasts opportunities to see killer whales, puffins and ospreys, and was once the biggest fishing station in the Shetland isles (before being abandoned in 1906).

Credit: Cascade News

Credit: Cascade News

Murray said: “Fethaland itself is unimaginable – there is no place like it. The wildlife is just phenomenal… I can’t do it justice.”

It even features as part of a virtual world, with a video game simulation at the Shetland museum allowing members to ‘walk’ around the area and learn about its history.

Credit: Cascade News

The area has 23 buildings, including a school, with moorings for boats, and is part of a Site of Special Scientific Interest, protected and administered by Scottish Natural Heritage.

Neil Risk Solicitors, who are selling the site, said: “Fethaland is known for its incredible scenery, and maritime and Viking history.

“Along with the other crofts it would be ideal for someone looking to experience rural living in arguably one of the most beautiful places in the UK.”

Being that far north, don’t expect shorts and t-shirt weather though. The maximum temperature in July, on average is only 14C, and in the winter months it barely stretches over freezing.

Credit: Google Maps

Even the Shetland tourist website gives a little hint of what to expect, weather-wise. It reads: “We do have perfectly calm days, but at most times there’s a breeze. Especially in the winter months, memorable storms produce spectacular skies and dramatic waves.”

Still, if warmer weather is more your thing, there was recently the chance to purchase a former council house in Cornwall for a tasty £1.4m. Another option, isn’t it?

A young lady was a little surprised when the waiter approached her and told her she couldn’t order more than a single beer. A few moments later, he came back and handed her a receipt with this note on it.

A fallen soldier got a touching memorial from a Tacoma, Washington, restaurant.

According to Buffalo Wild Wings server Brian Avey, a woman came into the restaurant last week for lunch and placed a drink order for two beers — a Blue Moon and a Corona.

“I told her she could only do one beer at a time,” Avey wrote in a Facebook post. “She said the Corona was for her brother who died in Iraq.”

The woman informed Avey that she wouldn’t be drinking the beer, and that it would simply be purchased to honor her brother.

“It just sat next [to] her at an empty seat her entire Lunch,” Avey wrote. “When I brought her bill I told her Buffalo Wild Wings will be buying that beer.”

The woman was so touched by the gesture that she wrote a message to Avey on her bill.

“Thank you. An act of kindness goes a long way. It means a lot to me. Have a great rest of your day,” she wrote, addressing it from “Grateful soldiers.”

“After she left, I didn’t have the heart to dump the beer out and throw it away, so I put it on top of the cooler next [to] the American Flag,” Avey wrote.

Avey’s boss, Dan, agreed that they couldn’t dispose of the beer.

“I just can’t throw this beer away,” Dan told Kiro-TV. He decided to let the beer stay as a tribute to the fallen soldier.

“Let’s keep it,” Dan reportedly told Avey. “Just make sure that we change out the lime every day.”

Avey’s post quickly went viral, garnering over 60,000 likes and nearly 30,000 shares since it was originally posted.