Domestic abuse survivor marries the first responder who came to her rescue.

Domestic abuse survivor marries the first responder who came to her rescue.

When Melissa Dohme Hill was 20 years old, she received a call from her high school ex-boyfriend asking to meet up one last time to gain closure. When she arrived, he pulled out a switchblade, stabbed her 32 times and left her bleeding by the side of the road.

She would have died there had it not been for Cameron Hill who was one of the first paramedics to arrive.

Five years later, the two are married.

“I would never want to go through the horrific attack again, but with where I am today, I wouldn’t change it,” Dohme Hill told CNN. “I would have never met Cameron, so I believe it was fate that brought us together.”

After the attack in 2012, Dohme Hill flatlined four times. She lost so much blood that she went into a coma and suffered a stroke that left her paralyzed. Many of her facial nerves were severed and she was left unable to speak or smile.

“I believe it was fate that brought us together,” Dohme Hill told CNN Cameron Hill was one of the first responders who found her and put her in a helicopter to the trauma center. A year later, the two met at a luncheon. They started dating two months after that. He proposed in 2015 at a baseball game, and the two were married this month in front of many of the first responders and doctors who’d helped Dohme Hill survive her attack. She now works as an advocate against domestic violence at Hands Across the Bay “My message to anyone hiding in silence…If you are currently being abused, know that you are not alone, and it is not your fault,” Dohme Hill told CNN. “Please reach out to your local domestic violence center for assistance on how to safely end the relationship, because ending an abusive relationship can be very dangerous.”

Meet the Boston doctor making house calls to the homeless

Meet the Boston doctor making house calls to the homeless

BOSTON — It’s Friday morning in Boston, which means Dr. Jim O’Connell is making his rounds.

He might be a little more comfortable inside a warm exam room, but that’s not where his patients are. O’Connell is Boston’s only doctor left still making house calls to the homeless.

Nearly 600,000 Americans are homeless, and many have health problems with no access to care. O’Connell and his nationally renowned team of “street doctors” are doing something about it, treating about 700 regular patients.

O’Connell and his team of psychologists and social workers spend their days walking around downtown where his patients live — in parks, under bridges and on the outskirts of town.

During his morning rounds, O’Connell himself usually sees about 20 patients. He knows where most of his patients sleep and knows who to ask if they are missing.

“I feel like I’m a country doctor in the middle of the city, you know?” he said.

O’Connell went to Harvard Medical School at the age of 30. After finishing his residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, he was on his way to a prestigious oncology fellowship when the city of Boston received a grant, along with 18 other cities, to improve their health care system for the homeless.

At the suggestion of his chief, O’Connell took what was supposed to be a one-year position as the founding doctor of the new health care program for Boston’s homeless. That turned into a 32-year career as head of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, now the country’s largest of its kind.

“You start to realize, ‘You know what, I’m just a doctor. And what I can do is I can get to know you and ease your suffering, just as I would as an oncologist,’” O’Connell said. “You could not find a more grateful population.”

O’Connell dispenses just about everything, from stitches for an arm to surgery for the soul. If patients can’t be treated on the street, O’Connell finds them a temporary treatment bed in a shelter.

O’Connell also sees patients at McInnis House, the main shelter of BHCHP. Patients sometimes stay for an extended period of time while they receive treatment.

“He’s like Jesus,” one of his patients said.

“This man is unbelievable!” another remarked. “This is my doctor. He’s been my doctor for life.”

O’Connell said he doesn’t think about what life would be like as a highly paid oncologist.

“I never think about it anymore,” he said.

Some things are more valuable than money. Just ask the man who gets everything from patients who have nothing at all to give.

Beyoncé follows Chance The Rapper’s footsteps. Donates $1 Million to Brooklyn Public Schools.

Beyoncé follows Chance The Rapper’s footsteps. Donates $1 Million to Brooklyn Public Schools.

Chance The Rapper had recently announced that he was donating $1 Million to the Chicago Public Schools. Very soon Beyoncé has followed suit by announcing that she too was donating $1 Million to Brooklyn Public Schools. She has not spoken to any Govt. Officials yet, but said that the kids in Brooklyn deserved a better future and she would do what she can to use her fame and fortune to ensure that every kid in Brooklyn gets a proper education.The rise in Education standards could drastically bring down the crime rate and increase employment level skills for a better future of the community.Beyoncé said that she would try and rope in more celebrities for the cause including her husband Jay Z.Early this month, Chance the Rapper had held a press conference to announce that he was donating $1 million to Chicago Public Schools.

Abused shelter dog a hero for finding naked girl shivering in cold

Abused shelter dog a hero for finding naked girl shivering in cold

DELTA COUNTY, MI – An abused shelter dog is hailed as a hero for finding a naked 3-year-old girl, who was curled up and shivering in a ditch near the dog’s new home, the shelter said.

An owner of the dog found the girl, wrapped her in a sweatshirt and rushed her to his home to warm up.

“Thanks to Peanut, a little girl’s life was saved today,” a woman wrote to Delta Animal Shelter, which shared the story on its Facebook page.

The girl was rescued around 11:15 a.m. Friday, March 17, near Rapid River in the Upper Peninsula’s Delta County.

The woman, who wasn’t identified, said that her dog “started going crazy at our house. She was running up and down the stairs, barking and yelping.”

The dog then went into the garage, where the woman’s husband was working on a project. The dog alerted him that it wanted to go outside. The husband had heard the dog running around but couldn’t figure out why.

Young, naked girl found lying in ditch in Upper Peninsula

“He let her outside and she went barreling into the field behind our house at full speed,” she wrote.

“My husband followed her and to his surprise, he found a naked, shivering, 3 year old girl curled up in a ball barely alive.”

She said he covered her with his sweatshirt and brought her inside. He called 911.

“The little girl was barely hanging on for her life. By the time the ambulance and police arrived, the little girl could only say one thing – ‘doggie,'” she wrote.

She said that the dog has been a blessing to her family.

“As you know, her background was so heartbreaking and we are so happy that we were able to take her into our home and give her the love and the family she deserves,” the woman said.

The dog still has a sense of its past life, though.

Once named Petunia, the dog was brought to the shelter last April with two broken legs, broken ribs and a stomach full of carpet.

The former owner was recently convicted of animal abuse, the shelter said.

“Petunia has a great new home with a wonderful family….and this formerly abused dog has now Saved the life of a little girl,” the shelter wrote.

The shelter was not releasing the name of the new owner, a worker said.

Meanwhile, Delta County sheriff’s deputies, who found the girl’s parents after going door-to-door, described the home as “unsafe and unsanitary.”

Police contact Child Protective Services workers who took custody of the girl and another young girl in the home.

Police said the temperature was around freezing at the time the girl was found.
Police have referred reports to prosecutors.